H'ugacakebi Kataudam Huyabca Naxnish Aducaxamid
We are working on a vision that was foreseen by our past chiefs

Nimi Icinohabi Program

Drbaydala
A Culturally Adapted Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program for Aboriginal Children and Youth
Lola T. Baydala, Betty Sewlal, Carmen Rasmussen, Kathleen Alexis, Fay Fletcher, Liz Letendre, Janine Odishaw, Merle Kennedy, Brenda Kootenay
From: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action
Volume 3, Issue 1, Spring 2009
pp. 37-46 | 10.1353/cpr.0.0054

ABSTRACT
 
Background: In response to substance abuse within their community, the Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation invited the University of Alberta (UofA) to partner in a collaborative effort to establish a school-based substance abuse prevention program.

Objectives: An evidence-based substance abuse prevention program was reviewed and adapted by the community to ensure that it incorporated their cultural beliefs, values, language, and visual images. The adapted program was delivered to students at Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation School and changes in student participants' knowledge, attitudes, refusal skills, and self-beliefs were measured. Benefits and challenges of adapting the program were documented.

Methods: The principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and the Canadian Institute for Health Research, Guidelines for Research Involving Aboriginal People, provided a frame of reference for the work throughout the research process. A pre-/posttest questionnaire was used to measure changes in student participants' drug and alcohol refusal skills, self-beliefs, and knowledge of the negative effects of drug and alcohol use. Focus groups (FGs) documented community members' experiences of and responses to the program adaptations and delivery.

Results: Results included (1) positive changes in students' drug and alcohol refusal skills, self-beliefs, and knowledge of the negative effects of drug and alcohol use, (2) ownership of and investment in the program by the community, (3) teaching approaches that correspond with the learning contexts, worldview, and relationships of the community, and (4) participation of community Elders.

Conclusion: Quantitative and qualitative measures provide evidence for the importance, benefits, and challenges of employing a culturally adapted evidence-based substance abuse prevention program with Aboriginal students attending a First Nations school.

Nimi Icinohabi Program Overview



Journals / Articles / Resources

The Life Skills Training® Program (LST)
 
Alberta Sweetgrass Article
 
Univeristy of Alberta News Release

Botvin Press Release 
  
First Peoples Child & Family Review 

Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health 9(2) 2011 
     

Comunity Pediatric Research Group
 
Community Health Network (2007-2008) LifeSkills® Training (LST) Substance Abuse Prevention Program for Aboriginal Children and Youth: Feasibility Study



The Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation Board of Education in Partnership with Alexis Health Services would like to acknowledge the following people for their support in the development of the Alexis Nimi Icinohabi Program:
 
- Alexis Elders
- Alexis Band Leaders
- Liz Letendre, Community Principal Investigator - Alexis Board of Education 
- Dr. Lola Baydala, University of Alberta Principal Investigator
- Dr. Fay Fletcher - Co-Principal Investigator
- Carmen Rasmussen, University of Alberta
- Betty Sewlal, Alexis Board of Education - Special Needs Coordinator / Editor and Writer
- Brenda Kootenay, Alexis Board of Education - Stoney Language Instructor
- Eugene Alexis, Alexis Board of Education - Stoney Language Instructor / Graphic Artist
- Brenda Desjarlais 
- Janine Odishaw
- Kathleen Alexis, Alexis Health Services - Administrative Assistant
- Stephanie Alexis, Alexis Board of Education - Volunteer Writer
- Lisa Alexis, Alexis Board of Education - Volunteer Writer
- Sherry Letendre, Alexis Heritage Institute, Researcher / Nimi Icinohabi Facilitator